Many view the day of Rosh Hashana as the Day of Judgement; when God looks at our past year’s actions and determines what the next year will look like. But if that’s all Rosh Hashana is, why don’t the Rabbis primarily refer to it as Yom Hadin, the Day of Judgement. Why call it Rosh Hashana, the beginning of the year? And why does the service on Rosh Hashana completely ignore the judgement? It doesn’t seem to focus on repentance or repairing ourselves on a personal level at all!

Join me as we uncover the true essence of Rosh Hashana, and you’ll discover that the judgement on Rosh Hashana is actually only a secondary function of the day and the true nature of the day is G-d’s yearly projection.

Happy Listening!

Rabbi Moshe

To sponsor a podcast or make a tax-deductible donation to support this podcast and DATA of Richardson: https://thethinkingjew.com/support-us/

Contact me with any questions, feedback or topic requests at [email protected]

Sources:

Rosh Hashana 16b, Mishna calls the day “Rosh Hashana” – https://www.sefaria.org/Rosh_Hashanah.16a.1?lang=bi&with=all&lang2=en

Sifsei Chaim, Moadim I, pg. 92 – not available online

Welcome to The Thinking Jew!

Subscribe to receive occasional updates and bonus information